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Dijon Mustard, France 4/1 Gal


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Sku: MUS07
Brand: Maille
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Dijon mustard is a traditional mustard???????????¡of France, named after the town of Dijon???????????¡in Burgundy, France.???????????¡it became popular in 1856, when Jean Naigeon of Dijon replaced the usual ingredient of vinegar in the recipe with verjuice, the acidic juice of unripe grapes.

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